Tag Archives: Chrome

ChromeVis a new Chrome Extension for Users with low Vision

From text that is too small to read, to user interfaces that do not offer keyboard navigation options, users with special needs face a lot of challenges when trying to access websites they are interested in. Google Chrome team believe that extensions can complement the work the team is  doing to make Google Chrome more accessible and can help users with disabilities turn the web from an often unwelcoming place to an environment they can truly enjoy.

Today Google is  launching a new category of featured extensions under the name “Accessibility”. On this page you’ll find ChromeVis a brand new extension from Google that allows users with low vision to magnify and change the color of selected text. You will also find extensions like Chrome Daltonize that can help color blind users to see more details in web pages or gleeBox that provides alternatives to actions traditionally performed via the mouse such as clicking, scrolling and selecting text fields.

All users can benefit from these extensions – not just users with disabilities. To encourage more developers to incorporate best practices in accessibility when designing extensions, Google’ve open sourced the code behind Chrome Vis and created relevant documentation. You can get more information in the Chromium blog.

One can develop a lot of great extensions to benefit users with special needs. Google plan to release a few more in the next months so stay tuned for more updates.

Google Chrome now support Adobe Flash Player

In Google’s most recent stable release of Google Chrome, they talked about beta-testing Adobe Flash Player integration into Chrome. They’ve enable this integration by default in the stable channel of Chrome. To read more about this integration, check out the Chromium blog.

In testing Flash Player integration into Chrome, the Chrome team admittedly spent many, many fun hours with a few of our favorite Flash-based indie games. So as a side project, they teamed up with a few creative folks to build Chrome FastBall, a Flash-based game built on top of the YouTube platform.

If you’re using Chrome, your browser should be automatically updated with Flash Player integration as of this week. And if you haven’t yet tried Chrome, download this newest stable release of the browser at google.com/chrome and take it for a test drive!

Fifa – Chrome Extension

Sore throats from yelling after every goal. Red eyes from waking up too early or staying up too late to watch a game. Sick leaves multiplying during important matches. It’s official: Football fever has spread around the globe, as the 2010 FIFA World Cup™ is already underway.

For those of you who are football fans, kick your game-watching up a notch with the FIFA.com Chrome extension that will help you stay up-to-date with the latest news and scores from South Africa. Most importantly, the extension notifies you when a match is about to begin and displays goal alerts within the browser in real-time for the matches you care about.

From the extension, you can also access match schedules and easily share match scores and personal commentary about specific plays and calls on Facebook, Twitter and Google Buzz. To complement the FIFA.com Chrome extension, you can personalise your browser with one of 32 custom themes that shows your team colors.

You can find the FIFA.com Chrome extension and themes in the World Cup section of the Chrome Extensions gallery. While you’re there, you can also try out more than 5,000 extensions — you may not find one that helps your team perform better on the field, but you’ll likely discover a few that can make your daily browsing more enjoyable. May the best team win!

Evolving from beta to stable with a faster version of Chrome

After a bit of evolution and lots of work by the Google team, they thrilled the world by introducing a new stable version of Chrome for Windows, Mac and Linux. Since last December, they’ve been chipping away at bugs and building in new features to get the Mac and Linux versions caught up with the Windows version, and now they finally announce that the Mac and Linux versions are ready for prime time.

Google Chrome for Windows

Google Chrome for Mac

Google Chrome for Linux

The performance bar for all three versions keeps getting higher: today’s new stable release for Windows, Mac and Linux is our fastest yet, incorporating one of Google’s most significant speed improvements to date. Chrome is  improved by213 percent and 305 percent in Javascript performance by the V8 and SunSpider benchmarks since their very first beta, back in Chrome’s Cretaceous period (September 2008). To mark these speed improvements, Google also released a series of three unconventional speed tests for the browser:

(If you’re interested in how Google pitted Chrome against the forces of a potato gun, lightning, and the speed of sound, take a look behind-the-scenes in this video, or read the full technical details in the video’s description drop-down in YouTube).

You may also notice that today’s new stable release comes with a few new features, including the ability to synchronize browser preferences across computers, new HTML5 capabilities and a revamped bookmark manager. For more details, read on in the Google Chrome Blog.

If you haven’t tried Google Chrome since the stone age, check out this brand new stable release. If you’re already using Chrome, you’ll be automatically updated to this new version soon. To try it right away, download the latest version at google.com/chrome.

Google Chrome finally available for Mac, but not recommended for download

Lots of Google fans who are using Mac computers have been waiting for what feels like ages for Chrome. Well, it’s finally here. The only catch is that Google doesn’t recommend downloading it right now. Say what? That’s right, it’s still in very early stages and it’s actually not for general consumption just yet. So far, getting it installed is as simple as most Mac app installations are. The look mimics that of Safari 4 to keep the Apple feel, but reports are saying that some aspects of Chrome seem faster than Safari or Firefox 3. It’s available for download if you want to try it out, but pages like YouTube don’t work and editing settings is not entirely available, either. Just remember before you go crazy that it’s still in a pre-release stage and recommended for devs only.


Google Chrome for Mac gets pictured

Mac users have long felt shafted when it comes to Google’s increasingly popular web browser. Sure, Google made it known that Chrome would be arriving on Macs at some point but the time frame is a bit of a mystery. While the when is still anyone’s guess, Google has at least provided confirmation that it is actively working on bringing the Chrome browser to OS X in the form of the first official screen shot, pictured above. Posted last night by Googler Avi Dressman under the heading “Now we can call it Chrome!”, little can be ascertained from the image other than the fact that, well, it looks like Chrome. As cute as the error message is, we’ll presume it is an indication that things are still early going and we still have a bit of a wait before any kind of alpha or beta release finds its way out to testers. In the meantime, if Safari and FireFox simply don’t get the job done for you – at least you can rest assured that Chrome is still on its way.

[Via Silicon Alley Insider]